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The Association of Main-Campus Retired Faculty

The Georgetown University Learning Community

 

Short non-credit courses on the Georgetown University Campus,

for persons ‘55 or better.’

 

Preregistration is required. Class-size will be limited.

Parking ($3/hour) in the South Parking Garage, entered from Canal Road.

 

Registration fees are $30 for one course, $50 for two or more courses.

Dues-paid members (and their spouses) of

The Association of Main-Campus Retired Faculty, The DC Alumni Club, The GU Library Associates,

and present or past GU Learning Community faculty,

are exempt from fees.

 

For registration, please scroll to the bottom of this page.

 

Classes will be held on the Georgetown University Main Campus.

For a map showing entrances to buildings used, click here.

For more-detailed directions to McShain, click here.

 

 

 

Schedule of Courses         Fall, 2014

 

Asian Religions and Christianity

James A. Wiseman, O.S.B., Professor of Theology, Emeritus, The Catholic University of America, and Abbot, St. Anselm’s Abbey, Washington, D.C.

Tuesdays, 2:00 – 3:30 p.m.; October 14, 21, 28.

McShain Lounge, McCarthy Hall.

The three class sessions will give a basic introduction to Hinduism, Buddhism, and the Chinese traditions of Daoism and Confucianism. We will also look at the ways in which one or another of these traditions intrigued and challenged Christian writers like Thomas Merton and Henri Le Saux and how they can also intrigue and challenge ourselves.

 

The Development of Italian Renaissance Thought: Paintings and Sculptures as Narrative Texts

Serafina Hager, Associate Professor of Italian, Emerita; former Chair of the Italian Department and Curricular Dean of the Faculty of Languages and Linguistics,

Wednesdays, 1:00-2:30, p.m.; Oct. 22, 29, Nov. 5.

               The Murray Room, Fifth Floor, Lauinger Library.

This course will trace the development of Renaissance thought from a theocentric to the anthropocentric worldview ushered in by the humanists through the literary, historical and philosophical analysis of a selected group of works of art by Giotto, Masaccio, Brunelleschi, Donatello, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raffaello, and others.  A packet of selected readings will be distributed to participants.

 

Science, Faith, and Teilhard de Chardin

John F. Haught, Distinguished Research Professor of Theology

Tuesday, October 28. 12:30 – 2:00 p.m..

The Murray Room, Fifth Floor, Lauinger Library.

After a brief summary of some of the major issues in science and theology, this lecture will introduce participants to the Jesuit geologist and religious thinker Teilhard de Chardin (1881-1955). Then it will reflect on the relevance this great thinker may still have to contemporary discussions on the relationship of the natural sciences to biblically-based religious thought.

 

 

Masterworks of English Modernist Poetry

Paul Betz, Professor of English, Emeritus; former Chair of the English Department.

Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.; Nov. 5, 12, 19.

McShain Lounge, McCarthy Hall.

We will discuss a small number of major lyric poems by William Butler Yeats (including "Easter 1916" and "Sailing to Byzantium"); T.S. Eliot (including "Sweeney Among the Nightingales" and "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock"); and Robert Lowell ("Skunk Hour"). Texts will be provided in the first class.

 

Navigating the Narratives of Genesis

Rabbi Harold S. White, Senior Advisor, Program for Jewish Civilization, Office of the President.

Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.; Nov. 11, 18, 25.

The Philodemic Room, Second floor, Healy Hall.

The course will cover three areas:  first, the Creation and Garden of Eden narratives; second, the Noah narrative; third, the ten generations between Adam and Abraham, including the Cain and Abel narrative, the Tower of Babel narrative, and the call of Abraham as the first Patriarch.

 

A Sixth Course is Expected to be Offered.

Further information on that course will be provided here when it becomes available. Participants may register for that course separately.

 

 

Fall registration opens two days after Labor Day.

Spring registration opens two days after New Year’s Day.

Registration is open for about four weeks, although specific courses may be filled sooner, or be open longer.

 

 To access the registration form, please click here.

 

After the last session of each course, please complete a course-evaluation form for that course.

 

 

 

If you have questions, please e-mail  ccpeprograms@georgetown.edu

or telephone The Center for Continuing and Professional Education (CCPE) at 202-687-7000.

 

 Click here to view a short video of part of a lecture given by Professor Emerita Joan Holmer on October 32, 2008 in a GU LC course:  

"Approaches to Shakespeare: Textual, Theatrical, and Thematic."

(Viewing the video requires the "quick time video player".

Click here for a free download of the QTVP program.)

 

Prior-semester GU LC  course programs

Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Spring 2009, Fall 2008,

 Spring 2008, Fall 2007,Spring 2007, Fall 2006, Fall 2005 and Spring 2006

 

Opinions expressed by GULC instructors are their own and do not necessarily reflect opinions of Georgetown University, the Association of Main-Campus Retired Faculty, the DC Alumni Club, the Library Associates, or the School for Continuing and Professional Studies.

 

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