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The Association of Main-Campus Retired Faculty

The Georgetown University Learning Community

 

Short non-credit courses on the Georgetown University Campus, for persons ‘55 or better.’

 

Preregistration is required. Class-size will be limited.

Parking ($3/hour) in the South Parking Garage, entered from Canal Road.

 

Registration fees are $30 for one course, $50 for two or more courses.

 

Dues-paid members (and their spouses) of the sponsoring organizations

(The Association of Main-Campus Retired Faculty, The DC Alumni Club, The GU Library Associates) and also present or past GU Learning Community faculty (and their spouses), are exempt from fees.

 

Fess should be paid by check made out to "Georgetown University" and also clearly marked "GU Learning Community" (using the line usually designated "For"). Checks should be mailed to The Georgetown University School of Continuing Studies, 640 Massachusetts Ave.,  NW, Washington, DC 20001.

 

Courses will be conducted on the Georgetown University Main Campus, 37th and O Streets, NW, Washington D.C..  For a campus-map showing the location of Hariri Hall, the Murray Room, and the entrance of McShain Lounge, please click here.

 

 

Schedule of Courses    Spring, 2016

(To register, please scroll to the bottom of the page.)

 

 

Edith Wharton and Earnest Hemingway:

The First World War and the Notion of Style

Paul R. Lilly, Professor of English, Emeritus, SUNY Oneonta

 

10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m..

Tuesdays, March 1, 8, 15; McShain Lounge, McCarthy Hall.

Monday, March 21; The Murray Room, Lauinger Library.

 

Both Wharton and Hemingway were deeply affected by WWI, lived in France, achieved early public recognition, and each presents an interesting contrast in style.  We will read Wharton’s The Age of Innocence (1920), Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises (1926), and selected short stories from Wharton’s Roman Fever and Other Stories, and Hemingway’s The Nick Adams Stories.  Suggestion:  Read online Jonathan Franzen’s essay on Edith Wharton, “A Rooting Interest,” in The New Yorker, Feb. 13, 2012.  For the first class, we will discuss Book One of The Age of Innocence, and the stories, “Roman Fever” and “The Other Two.”

 

 

Exploring Topics In Marine Ecology

Philip Sze, Associate Professor of Biology, Emeritus.

 

10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m..

Tuesdays, April 5, 12, 26. McShain Lounge, McCarthy Hall.

 

We will discuss three contrasting marine systems. First we will consider the simple ecological system in the intertidal region of New England’s rocky shores. Second we will discuss coral reefs as complex ecosystems, and threats from pollution (nutrient enrichment) and climate change. Finally, we will discuss plankton in open water where algal blooms (large growths of microscopic algae) may be either beneficial or harmful and conclude with consideration of conditions in 2015, including El Niño.

 

 

Studia Humanitatis: The Rebirth of the Liberal Arts in the Italian Renaissance
Deborah Ross Warin, Director, the Renaissance Company, former Director of Continuing Education at Georgetown.

10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m..

Wednesdays, April 6 & 13; Friday, April 15.

The Murray Room, Lauinger Library.

 

The historic period and cultural movement we call the Italian Renaissance was so named by the reawakening or “rebirth” of interest in the classical, secular, intellectual Greco-Roman tradition and culture. In fact our modern understanding of a liberal arts education is rooted in the period when 15th C Renaissance humanists, in the compelling but elusive quest to understand the nature and meaning of being human, turned from studia divinitatis (sacred studies) to studia humanitatis (humane studies). From this there grew a widely held conviction in the transformative power of the study of liberal arts in both the moral and intellectual development of individuals and society. Networks of male and female humanists quickly grew throughout the peninsula and in little time “the golden age of liberal arts – grammar, poetry, rhetoric, painting, sculpture, architecture and music” flourished.  Both having and continuing to pursue a rigorous classical education became a requisite for credibility politically, socially and culturally.  Expanding educational opportunities became a civic duty, as did partaking of them.

In this course, we will look at the developments of Liberal Humanism during the Italian Renaissance, and read and discuss some of the key figures who shaped the period. In so doing, we will examine how this pivotal period shaped (and may depart from) our own understanding of the value and expectations of a liberal arts education.

 

 

The Experience of Alzheimer’s Disease:

A Bio-Psycho-Social Perspective

Steven R. Sabat, Professor of Psychology, Emeritus.

10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m..

Fridays, March 11 & 18. Murray Room, Lauinger Library.

 

Alzheimer’s disease has been presented in the mass media primarily as a disease a person has, with emphasis on the defects that the disease purportedly produces.  This course will be an introduction to understanding “the person the disease has”.  We will explore how what a person diagnosed says and does can be a function of (a) brain damage, (b) the person’s reaction to the effects of brain damage, and (c) the way the person is viewed and treated by others.

 

Business Ethics

George Brenkert, Professor Emeritus,

McDonough School of Business

 

2:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m.

Tuesdays, March 15, 22, 29. Room 360, Hariri Hall.

 

This class provides an ever-so-brief overview of some of the issues that arise within business ethics.   Why believe that business ethics is anything other than an oxymoron?  What does ethics have to say about business and its search for profits?  What about various management or marketing issues?  And how might business ethics speak to questions of international business ethics?   The issues are endless, the topics complex, and their importance terribly significant for all of us.   I look forward to a class in which I will present various materials, but in which there will be a good amount of interaction and exchange of ideas for which I hope to be the catalyst.

 

 

Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead

William C. McFadden, S.J., Professor of Theology, Emeritus

 

1:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m..  Friday, April 8; Wednesday, April 13. 

Large McShain Lounge, McCarthy Hall.

 

This novel, honored in 2005 by the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Critics, takes the form of a long letter from a 76-year-old Congregationalist minister, John Ames, to his 7-year-old son.  Ames has learned that he has a heart condition that will end his life in the near future but he has so much to tell the boy about the mysteries of life that he resolves to set it down in a letter the boy can read when he grows up.

        James Wood calls Gilead "a beautiful work — demanding, grave and lucid."

 

 

To register, please click here.

 

Fall registration normally opens a few days after Labor Day. Spring registration generally opens shortly after New Year’s Day. Registration is open for at least four weeks, although specific courses may be filled sooner, or be open longer.
 

Registration fees are $30 for one course, $50 for two or more courses.

 

Dues-paid members (and their spouses) of the sponsoring organizations

(The Association of Main-Campus Retired Faculty, The DC Alumni Club, The GU Library Associates) and also present or past GU Learning Community faculty (and their spouses), are exempt from fees.

 

Fess should be paid by check made out to "Georgetown University" and also clearly marked "GU Learning Community" (using the line usually designated "For"). Checks should be mailed to The Georgetown University School of Continuing Studies, 640 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, DC 20001.

 

If you have questions, please e-mail  sap48@georgetown.edu or ccpeprograms@georgetown.edu, or telephone Sanéa Pinkney at The Center for Continuing and Professional Education (CCPE)

at 202-687-7000

 

Click here to view a short video of part of a lecture given by Professor Emerita Joan Holmer on October 31, 2008 in a GU LC course:

"Approaches to Shakespeare: Textual, Theatrical, and Thematic."

(Viewing the video requires the "quick time video player".

Click here for a free download of the QTVP program.)

 

Prior-semester GU LC  course programs: 

Fall 2015, Spring 2015, Fall 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Spring 2009, Fall 2008, Spring 2008, Fall 2007, Spring 2007, Fall 2006, Fall 2005 and Spring 2006

Opinions expressed by GULC instructors are their own and do not necessarily reflect opinions of Georgetown University, the Association of Main-Campus Retired Faculty, the DC Alumni Club, the Library Associates, or the School for Continuing and Professional Studies.

 

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