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The Association of Main-Campus Retired Faculty

The Georgetown University Learning Community

 

Short non-credit courses on the Georgetown University Campus, for persons ‘55 or better.’

 

Preregistration is required. Class-size will be limited.

Parking ($3/hour) in the South Parking Garage, entered from Canal Road.

 

Registration fees are $30 for one course, $50 for two or more courses.

 

Dues-paid members (and their spouses) of

The Association of Main-Campus Retired Faculty, The DC Alumni Club, The GU Library Associates, and present or past GU Learning Community faculty, are exempt from fees.

 

For registration, scroll to the bottom of this page.

 

Classes will be held on the University Main Campus.

For a map of entrances to buildings used, click here.

 

After each course, please complete

a course-evaluation form for that course.

 

 

Schedule of Courses, Spring, 2015

 

Nuclear Weapons, Arms Control and Global Security

Pierce S. Corden, former division chief in the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, Deputy Executive Chairman of the U.N. Special Commission (for Iraq), and currently visiting scholar at the Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

March 4, 11, 18.

The Murray Room, Fifth Floor, Lauinger Library.

United States foreign and security policy and commitments, as embodied in the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, are intended to establish a global order for a nuclear-weapons-free world, and “general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control.”  This course will consider the unique threats posed by nuclear weapons – weapons of mass destruction – their numbers and spread, and the possibility of terrorist acquisition.  We will review the complex of international treaties and other measures established since the end of World War II that seek to move the world to a more sustainable security framework, and discuss prospects for further progress in reaching this objective.

 

From the Wright Brothers to the Moon, Mars, and Beyond

John P. Sheahan had a 32-year career at NASA, including work on projects ranging from Apollo to the International Space Station.  Following retirement from NASA, he was on the staff of the George Mason University School of Public Policy for several years.

Thursdays, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

March 5, 12, 19, 26.

                        The Murray Room, Fifth Floor, Lauinger Library

This four-part course will focus on the momentous changes that have taken place in the aerospace sector in just over 120 years, their impact on society, the story behind early aviation milestones, the “Cold War,” and the subsequent “Space Race.” It will also cover the uncertain state of space activities today, as well as the challenges and rewards of exploring space in the future.

 

Virginia Woolf and William Faulkner

Paul R. Lilly,    Professor of English, Emeritus, SUNY, Oneonta.        

Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

March 10, 17, and 24.

McShain Lounge, McCarthy Hall       

Most readers believe that the book that launched the modernist trend is James Joyce’s Ulysses (1922). Within a few years, Virginia Woolf and William Faulkner presented novels that reflect the techniques of Ulysses transformed by their two different cultures, England and the American South. The course will examine Woolf’s To the Lighthouse (1927) and Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury (1929). The first class will focus on To the Lighthouse; the second and third on The Sound and the Fury. The Modern Library’s ranking of the one hundred finest modern novels in English lists Ulysses as number one, with the latter two among the top fifteen.

 

Germany and Europe.

Karl H. Cerny, Professor of Government, Emeritus.

Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m - 12:00 p.m.

 April 14, 21, 28.

McShain Lounge, McCarthy Hall       

By now it has become commonplace to note that Germany is the leader of Europe.  But how well and effectively does it lead?  In successive sessions, the leadership of Germany will be examined in its economic, military, and socio-political dimensions.

 

Ecology in National Parks.

Philip Sze, Associate Professor of Biology, Emeritus.

Wednesdays, 1:30 - 3:00

April 8, 15, 22.

The Murray Room, Fifth Floor, Lauinger Library

Visitors to national parks in the US and other countries have opportunities to observe natural ecological systems. In this course, we will discuss research on these ecosystems with a particular focus on species interactions, the role of natural disturbances, trophic cascades (food-chain regulation), and the impact of invasive species. We will consider case studies that include fires, bears and wolves in Yellowstone, large herbivores and grasses in the Serengeti ecosystem, mountain lions in Zion, sea otters in Alaskan kelp forests, endangered and invasive species in the Channel Islands (CA), and Rock Creek as an urban park.

 

What’s Love Got to Do with It? The Politics of the Marriage Game and the Passions of Courtly Love in Renaissance Italy.

 Deborah Ross Warin, Director of the Renaissance Company and former Director of Continuing Education of Georgetown University            

Thursdays, 10:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

April 9, 16, 23.

The Murray Room, Fifth Floor, Lauinger Library

"And yet, to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together nowadays…."  Shakespeare’s line from A Midsummer Night’s Dream sums up the prevailing attitude toward love and marriage during the Italian Renaissance. Marriage was far too important a decision to be left to the deceits of passion. "Reason" was the truth behind marital alliances – alliances that could unite princely families, secure treaties, or promise fortune and prosperity to ambitious families seeking to upgrade their arriviste status from merchant class to nobility. At the same time, the medieval tradition of courtly love, the passion for the ideal, unattainable lady, continued to flourish in the cultural life of the Renaissance while the fruits of attainable passion populated the courts and the country with illegitimate children. When Neo-Platonism swept the peninsula in the mid 1400’s, a new dynamic was added to this courtly love tradition, creating a flourish of artistic, literary and philosophical activity. In this course, we will look at these influences, their effect on the politics and culture of the period, and the hidden stories behind the works that often display the dichotomy between principles and practice.

 

 To access the registration form, please click here.

 

After the last session of each course,

please complete a course-evaluation form

for that course.

 

Fall registration opens two days after Labor Day.

Spring registration opens two days after New Year’s Day.

Registration is open for about four weeks, although specific courses may be filled sooner, or be open longer.

 

If you have questions, please e-mail  ccpeprograms@georgetown.edu

or telephone The Center for Continuing and Professional Education (CCPE) at 202-687-7000.

 Click here to view a short video of part of a lecture given by Professor Emerita Joan Holmer on October 31, 2008 in a GU LC course:  

"Approaches to Shakespeare: Textual, Theatrical, and Thematic."

(Viewing the video requires the "quick time video player".

Click here for a free download of the QTVP program.)

 

Prior-semester GU LC  course programs

Fall 2014, Spring 2014, Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Fall 2012, Spring 2012, Fall 2011, Spring 2011, Fall 2010, Spring 2010, Fall 2009, Spring 2009, Fall 2008,

 Spring 2008, Fall 2007, Spring 2007, Fall 2006, Fall 2005 and Spring 2006

 

Opinions expressed by GULC instructors are their own and do not necessarily reflect opinions of Georgetown University, the Association of Main-Campus Retired Faculty, the DC Alumni Club, the Library Associates, or the School for Continuing and Professional Studies.

 

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